HMIC Inspection Reports

The PCC has a statutory obligation to comment on reports published by HMIC about Sussex Police. To make these easily accessible, and to keep the public fully informed and updated on any responses the PCC has to HMIC’s inspection of Sussex Police, a copy of these comments will be published below along with links to the relevant report and Sussex Police’s response, when one is provided.

 

 

From to or
PEEL: Effectiveness
02/03/2017

The 'Effectiveness' strand of the 2016 Police Effectiveness Efficiency and Legitimacy (PEEL) inspection looked at:

  • How effective are police forces at preventing crime, tackling anti-social behaviour and keeping people safe?
  • How effective are forces at investigating crime and reducing re-offending?
  • How effective are forces at protecting those who are vulnerable from harm, and supporting victims?
  • How effective are forces at tackling serious and organised crime?
  • How effective are the forces’ specialist capabilities?

The national report can be viewed here. The Sussex report can be viewed here. 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

PEEL: Legitimacy
08/12/2016

The 'Legitimacy' strand of the 2016 Police Effectiveness Efficiency and Legitimacy (PEEL) inspection looked at:

  • To what extent does the force treat all of the people it serves with fairness and respect?
  • How well does the force ensure that its workforce behaves ethically and lawfully?
  • To what extent does the force treat its workforce with fairness and respect?

The national report can be viewed here. The Sussex report can be viewed here.

 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

PEEL: Efficiency
03/11/2016

The 'Efficiency' strand of the 2016 Police Effectiveness Efficiency and Legitimacy (PEEL) inspection looked at:

  • How well does the force understand its current and likely future demand?
  • How well does the force use its resources to manage current demand?
  • How well is the force planning for demand in the future?

The national report can be viewed here. The Sussex report can be viewed here.

 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Constabulary presented a report to the Secretary of State under section 54(4A) of the Police Act 1996. As required by that section, it contains an assessment of the efficiency and effectiveness of policing in England and Wales in respect of the inspection year 2015.

This reporting period has seen the first complete cycle of PEEL (police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy) inspections, which consider the effectiveness and efficiency of police forces, and assess the legitimacy of how they discharge their obligations (that is, how they behave and treat people). These inspections provide a comprehensive analysis of the way in which each police force in England and Wales has performed, and will continue to do so on an annual basis.
The report can be viewed here

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

The primary role of the police is to prevent crime and anti-social behaviour, and to protect individuals, communities and victims – especially those who are vulnerable. This report sets out findings from an inspection of how effectively the 43 police forces in England and Wales are meeting these objectives. HMIC defines an effective force as one that reduces crime, and keeps people safe. After consultation with the public, forces, police and crime commissioners, Government and other interested parties, HMIC has assessed forces’ effectiveness by asking how well they:

  1. prevent crime and anti-social behaviour, and keep people safe;
  2. investigate crime and manage offenders;
  3. protect those who are vulnerable, and support victims; and
  4. tackle serious and organised crime, including their arrangements for fulfilling their national policing responsibilities.

This is one strand of HMIC’s PEEL (police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy) annual, all-force assessment. The effectiveness report follows reports on efficiency and legitimacy, published in October 2015 and February 2016 respectively. The findings relating to question 3 above were published in December 2015, so that forces could start making immediate improvements to ensure that all vulnerable people receive the protection and support which they need.

The national report can be viewed here.
The Sussex report can be viewed here.

 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

As part of its annual inspections into police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy (PEEL), HMIC’s legitimacy programme assessed how legitimate the force is at keeping people safe and reducing crime. The inspection focused on whether a force was consistently behaving in a way that is fair, reasonable, effective and lawful, and if it has the consent of the public.

HMIC assessed legitimacy at a force level, as well as drawing out overarching themes on a national level which are set out in the national overview.
The legitimacy report follows on from reports on efficiency and effectiveness (vulnerability) in 2015 and will be followed by reports on overall effectiveness in spring 2016.
The national report can be viewed here.
The Sussex report can be viewed here.

 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

This study was undertaken to help HMIC understand better the effect that digital technology is having on crime and policing, for the purpose of informing future HMIC inspections of police forces and law enforcement agencies. The report can be viewed here.

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

The extent to which a police force is successful at identifying, protecting and supporting those who are vulnerable is a core indicator of its overall effectiveness. In recognition of this, as part of its annual PEEL effectiveness inspection programme, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) graded all 43 police forces in England and Wales on how effectively they protect vulnerable people from harm and support victims. The inspection included a focus on how they respond to domestic abuse victims and missing and absent children, and how prepared they are to tackle child sexual exploitation.

This is the first time that we have graded forces on their effectiveness at protecting vulnerable people from harm (although HMIC has examined many aspects of vulnerability through a range of other inspections).
The national overview report summarises the top-line findings of this inspection, and sets out the grades (of outstanding, good, requires improvement or inadequate) given to each force. The force reports give the detailed inspection findings which led to these grades.
In addition, there are (or will be) other thematic reports based on the vulnerability inspection findings. These are:
The national report can be viewed here.
The Sussex report can be viewed here.

 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

Honour-based violence (HBV) is the term used to refer to a collection of practices used predominantly to control the behaviour of women and girls within families or other social groups in order to protect supposed cultural and religious beliefs, values and social norms in the name of ‘honour’. HBV incidents and crimes include specific types of offence, such as forced marriage and female genital mutilation, and acts which have long been criminalised, such as assault, rape and murder. Throughout this report, we use HBV to refer to the full range of incidents and crimes which perpetrators carry out under the guise of maintaining or protecting perceived ‘honour’.

This is the first HMIC inspection to focus on HBV. Our findings are set out in the report, which also contains recommendations for the Home Office, the National Police Chiefs Council, chief constables, and the College of Policing. The national report can be viewed here.

 

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

The HMIC report sets out the findings of a review of the quality of criminal case files. It examines how effective the police are in providing accurate information of the circumstances of the case, identifying the vulnerability of victims and witnesses, and assessing and managing risks so the needs of witnesses and victims are met. The national report can be viewed here. The Sussex report can be viewed here.

PCC's Response

The PCC's response can be viewed here.

Page 1, 2, 3
Subscribe to our newsletter
Keep up to date with our latest news and information